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22 March 1996 —
21 April 1996

Jim Vivieaere:
An Inventory of an Urban Polynesian

Jim Vivieaere, Inventory of an Urban Polynesian, 1996 (installation view)
Jim Vivieaere, Inventory of an Urban Polynesian, 1996 (detail). Tamaka (reef sandals), c.1899, Rarotonga, Cook Islands. Kiriau (hibiscus fibres).
Jim Vivieaere, Inventory of an Urban Polynesian, 1996 (detail)
Jim Vivieaere, Inventory of an Urban Polynesian, 1996 (detail). Ann Robinson, glass vase. Courtesy of FHE Galleries.
Jim Vivieaere, Inventory of an Urban Polynesian, 1996 (detail)
Jim Vivieaere, Inventory of an Urban Polynesian, 1996 (detail). Pareu (skirt), c.1899, Rarotonga, Cook Islands. Tapa, fabric.
Jim Vivieaere, Inventory of an Urban Polynesian, 1996 (detail). Kumete (bowl), c.1800, Mauke, Cook Islands. Loaned by Auckland Museum.

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Jim Vivieare’s art is about the process of trafficking, the shifting of objects from one place to another. It implies the concept of exchange and negotiation, establishing relationships of trust and support. The relationships between these objects have an obvious visual occurrence of function and resonance; they posture in a fictive exhibition, to convey a sense of truth, location and continuity. 

For this exhibition Vivieaere has recontextualised items from an ethnographic museum into a museum-like display in an art gallery. The borrowed items are all from everyday life for pacific people (like sandals, clothing etc), that have been collected by zealous ethnographers as cultural artefacts and stored for research in the museum. One can’t help but picture a slightly nerdy scientist gathering objects that fit his story of the ‘local rituals’.

This is the third time that Vivieaere has worked in a museum environment, establishing relationships with the artefacts and the display areas of Pacific Island stored culture.

Te Tuhi is temporarily closed under Alert Level 3.

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