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platform
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contemporary
art

24 April 2010 —
20 June 2010

Wall of Sound

Ann Lislegaard, Science Fiction_3114, 2009 (installation view). Sound installation. 28 mins, looped. Courtesy of Galerie Paul Andriesse, Amsterdam and Murray Guy Gallery, New York. Photo by Sam Hartnett.
Ann Lislegaard, Science Fiction_3114, 2009 (installation view). Sound installation, 28 mins, looped. Courtesy of Galerie Paul Andriesse, Amsterdam and Murray Guy Gallery, New York. Photo by Sam Hartnett.
Clinton Watkins, Untitled (Force Field), 2010 (installation view). Stereo sound with sub woofer, dual channel DVD projection.  20 mins, looped. Courtesy of Two Rooms, Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland. Photo by Sam Hartnett.
Clinton Watkins, Untitled (Force Field), 2010 (installation view). Stereo sound with sub woofer, dual channel DVD projection.  20 mins, looped. Courtesy of Two Rooms, Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland. Photo by Sam Hartnett.
Clinton Watkins, Untitled (Force Field), 2010 (installation view). Stereo sound with sub woofer, dual channel DVD projection.  20 mins, looped. Courtesy of Two Rooms, Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland. Photo by Sam Hartnett.
Marco Fusinato, O_King Variations, 2004 (installation view). 100 perspex records. Courtesy of Anna Schwartz Gallery, Melbourne. Photo by Sam Hartnett.
Marco Fusinato, O_King Variations, 2004 (installation view). 100 perspex records. Courtesy of Anna Schwartz Gallery, Melbourne. Photo by Sam Hartnett.
Marco Fusinato, Drawings for O_King Variations, 2004 (installation view). Courtesy of Anna Schwartz Gallery, Melbourne. Photo by Sam Hartnett.
Richard Francis, Two Forms of Nothing, 2010 (installation view). Eight-channel sound installment. Courtesy of the artist. Photo by Sam Hartnett.
Richard Francis, Two Forms of Nothing, 2010 (installation view). Eight-channel sound installment. Courtesy of the artist. Photo by Sam Hartnett.
Wall of Sound, 2010 (installation view). Photo by Sam Hartnett.
Richard Francis & Clinton Watkins, ¡Recurde!, 24 April 2010. Opening performance. Photo by Sam Hartnett.

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Wall of Sound groups together four artists who in individual ways explore the properties of sound within their artistic practice. The title Wall of Sound derives from a music production technique developed for pop and rock music in the 1960's in order to generate recordings that played well on early analogue systems. Developed by the controversial American record producer Phil Spector, who engineered key albums by The Beatles, The Beach Boys and The Ramones, this technique required a large amount of layering in the recordings in order to produce dense, reverberant sound on mono AM frequencies. Here, the title seeks to evoke the artists' attraction to layered, analogue sounds and the acoustics of the gallery spaces.

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Media release – Wall of Sound, 2010

Press

EyeContact – Te Tuhi Sound Exhibition